24-Hour Hotline:

702-646-4981

Learn the Facts with DV101

…The more you know…

CONFIDENTIALITY

Confidentiality is the basis for all of our services. All Safe Nest staff and volunteers are held to rigorous confidentiality requirements by funding sources and federal regulations.

Frequently when we experience the trauma of domestic violence we feel disconnected and without power.  Our violent partner’s actions are used for one purpose: to gain and maintain power and control over us.  These actions all lead to our isolation from others; even those closest to us. Their behaviors toward us result in our thinking we are helpless and sometimes feeling responsible.

WHAT IS DOMESTIC VIOLENCE

Power and Control Wheel

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Equality Wheel

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Domestic violence is the intimidation, physical assault, battery, sexual assault, and/or other abusive behavior as part of a pattern of power and control perpetrated by one intimate partner against another.   Domestic violence is an epidemic affecting individuals regardless of age, economic status, sexual orientation, gender, race, religion, or nationality.

It includes:

  • Physical violence
    • A FEW EXAMPLES: Pushing, pinching or biting, slapping, beating, or kicking, chocking, backing you into a corner, pinning you down, throwing objects, hair pulling, not allowing you to leave a room, spitting.
  • Sexual violence
    • A FEW EXAMPLES: Unwanted touching, fondling, kissing or any type of unwanted contact with you or someone else’s body.
  • Psychological violence
    • A FEW EXAMPLES: Confinement, isolation, humiliation, intimidation, or any other treatment which may diminish the sense of identity, dignity, and self-worth of victim.
  • Emotional abuse
    • A FEW EXAMPLES: Yelling or swearing, bullying, name calling or insults; mocking. Threats, ignoring or excluding

WHAT ARE THE SIGNS OF DOMESTIC ABUSE?

Bruises or injuries that look like they came from choking, punching, or being thrown down. Black eyes, red or purple marks at the neck, and sprained wrists are common injuries in violent relationships.

  • Attempting to hide bruises with makeup or clothing
  • Making excuses like tripping or being accident-prone or clumsy. Often the seriousness of the injury does not match up with the explanation.
  • Having few close friends and being isolated from relatives and coworkers and kept from making friends
  • Having to ask permission to meet, talk with, or do things with other people
  • Having little money available; may not have credit cards or even a car
  • Having low self-esteem; being extremely apologetic and meek
  • Referring to the partner’s temper but not disclosing the extent of the abuse
  • Having a drug or alcohol abuse problem
  • Having symptoms of depression, such as sadness or hopelessness, or loss of interest in daily activities
  • Talking about suicide, attempting suicide, or showing other warning signs of suicide. Encourage this person to talk with a health professional.

WHAT HAPPENS WHEN SOMEONE CALLS THE HOTLINE

All phone calls are confidential.

  • You will speak with a highly trained and experienced advocate.
  • Advocates are required to attend 20 hours of training under Nevada State law. Safe Nest requires those individuals wishing to interact with victims of domestic violence to receive 40 hours of training.
  • You do not have to be ready to leave your partner.
  • They will ask if you are in a safe place to talk.
  • Your safety is our number one priority so if your abuser walks in while you are speaking with us, hang up the phone. We are available to talk 24-hours a day, seven days a week, 365 days a year so you can always call us back.  For your safety we will never call you back.
  • Tell us about your situation
  • Before we can help you with the appropriate resources, we need to hear what’s going on. Be honest, and it will help you put things in perspective as you speak with someone.  It will also give us a timeline of your relationship.
  • Let’s do some safety planning
  • After we’ve had a chance to hear your situation, we’ll determine what resources you need. It may be an individualized safety plan for you and your children while you continue to live with your partner or if you are getting ready to leave.

SAFE NEST HELPS BATTERERS AND ABUSERS

If you are the batterer and/or abuser in the relationship Safe Nest can help you.  Our goal is to completely break the cycle of violence, and this includes batterers treatment through support groups, individualized counseling and marriage and family counseling.

Call our 24-hour hotline to speak with a confidential advocate or our counseling office to speak with a counselor.  702-646-4981

MYTHS & MISCONCEPTION

DOMESTIC VIOLENCE IS NOT A PROBLEM IN MY COMMUNITY.
  • According to the National Coalition Against Domestic Violence, Nevada continually ranks first in domestic violence homicide. Nationally and statewide, one in three women will be affected by domestic violence in her lifetime.  Statistically, one in seven men are affected by domestic violence.
DOMESTIC VIOLENCE ONLY HAPPENS TO POOR WOMEN AND WOMEN OF COLOR.
  • Domestic violence happens regardless of social status, socioeconomic background, sex, and skin color.
THEY DESERVED TO BE HIT.
  • Physical abuse is never ok. The only person responsible for the abuse is the abuser.
  • Physical violence, even among family members, is wrong and against the law.
ALCOHOL, DRUG ABUSE, STRESS, AND MENTAL ILLNESS CAUSE DOMESTIC VIOLENCE.
  • Alcohol, drug abuse, stress, and mental illness are often excuses for abusers.
DOMESTIC VIOLENCE IS A PERSONAL PROBLEM BETWEEN A HUSBAND AND A WIFE.
  • Domestic violence affects everyone. Regardless if the relationship is heterosexual or same sex.
IF IT WERE THAT BAD, SHE WOULD JUST LEAVE.
  • There are many reasons why women may not leave. Not leaving does not mean that the situation is okay or that the victim wants to be abused.
  • The most dangerous time for a victim is when he/she chooses to leave. Only the victim knows when it’s appropriate.
ESCAPE